Keto Croissants

Tartine bakery was kind enough to share their croissant recipe here, https://www.saveur.com/best-croissants-recipe, and I recently adapted it with a keto-friendly flour blend and using sweetener instead of sugar.  The biggest changes have to do with creating a good dough, and the baking procedure.  It took me several tries until I got nice doughs with the keto flour.  Using a stand mixer with dough hook (or a bread machine) is key…I really don’t think you’ll be able to develop it with hand kneading.  Also, adding water seems to help when the dough gets stiff and chunky.

I can’t take any credit for this unconventional blend of low-carb ingredients – you can thank @keto.luna for that!  Here is her flour blend recipe.  I usually make this in large batches, sift well, and store in a vaccuum tight container.

Experimental All-Purpose Keto Flour
Yields: 214 g (approx. 2 2/3 cups)
Nutrition: Per 20 g (1/4 cup) serving: 83 cal, 0. 1 g net carb, 1 g fat, 12 g protein

  • 60 g micellar casein
  • 40 g whey protein isolate, unflavored
  • 60 g inulin fiber
  • 20 g egg white powder
  • 20 g egg yolk powder
  • 4 g xanthan gum
  • 10 g psyllium husk (I use powdered)

Croissants are known for their flaky, delicate layers and a webby honeycomb interior.  I’m still working on this recipe to get the honeycomb crumb, but this version should get you lots of buttery layers.  I have provided here a full batch of 14-16 croissants, but I have halved it with success – just need to work quickly and know when to pop it back in the fridge.  I have also frozen my shaped dough prior to the final rise, thawed a roll or two on another day, then did the final rise and bake.  It was just as wonderful!

19 thoughts on “Keto Croissants

  1. Hi Jackie,
    Been lurking the Internet for weeks in search of this.
    Being from Paris, low carb life is impossible without croissants.
    Thanks a lot for this, I’ll try and let you know.
    Good luck for your journey!
    J.

    1. Hi Johan, thanks for the comment! This is definitely a developmental recipe and there’s a lot of things I want to try. I’ll be sure to share any new findings. Would love to know how yours goes!

  2. Hello,
    I really enjoyed making standard croissant in the past but actually on keto is different, did you use special keto mix flour or almon one? Thanks for suggestions

  3. Wondering what the purpose of micellar casein is and the whey protein? Asking because I’d like to substitute those ingredients for ones that don’t have casein in it as I would be baking the for individuals with casein sensitivities.

    Experimental All-Purpose Keto Flour
    Yields: 214 g (approx. 2 2/3 cups)
    Nutrition: Per 20 g (1/4 cup) serving: 83 cal, 0. 1 g net carb, 1 g fat, 12 g protein

    60 g micellar casein
    40 g whey protein isolate, unflavored
    60 g inulin fiber
    20 g egg white powder
    20 g egg yolk powder
    4 g xanthan gum
    10 g psyllium husk (I use powdered)

    1. Hi Meghan! The reading I have done regarding the keto flour blend says that casein + inulin fiber creates structures that mimic what starch would typically do, which is suspend the proteins and create bulk for the gluten network. Whey protein is another bulking item that gives you substance in the form of protein instead of starch. I have never played with substitutes for these ingredients with bread items. Off the top of my head, I would probably try lupin flour, oat fiber, carbalose, wheat protein isolate. Happy experimenting!

  4. Hi Jackie,
    These looks great and I’d love to given them a go as I’ve tried more of a fathead dough recipe before which tasted great but the layering was not there.

    But I’m not eating gluten… Have you tried this not using the gluten? i.e. using 100% of that keto flour instead of 50/50?

    Regards
    Paul

    1. I have not attempted croissants without gluten because I’m fairly sure it won’t work! You really need that gluten network to inflate the dough and get nice air pockets.

  5. Hello Jackie! Your recipe and pictures for the croissants look soo delicious!…I will have to order the ingredients on Amazon…Just wondering if inulin fiber is the same as inulin powder?

    1. Hi Melissa, I believe they are the same. You’ll want to check if it comes from chicory root or jerusalem artichoke. I recall from Keto.Luna that you want the artichoke inulin.

  6. Hi Jackie! I’ve been searching for (edible) keto croissants for two years!! I’m SO excited to make these! One question though; if you have the croissants in a warm, humid spot to proof them, won’t that cause the butter to melt and be absorbed back into the dough?
    Thank you! Please post more recipes!

    1. Hi Anne, thank you so much for the comment! It’s a really good question and something I wondered as well. The final proof is fine at room temperature. It should not be so warm that it liquefies butter. The layers will still remain separate since it’s already shaped and you’re no longer manipulating and laminating. When you start baking it, you may notice some butter leakage but by that point, the layers should be pretty defined!

  7. So impressed! Have you had any luck with getting the honeycomb texture? I am working on these over the next couple months, hopefully, using your recipe and methods. I wonder what the honeycomb secret is? Cheers and thanks so much!

    1. Hey Mike, thanks for the comment! I have achieved the honeycomb baking regular flour croissants. The key is a nicely developed, stretchy dough and adequate proofing prior to baking. I have some brioche dough in the freezer with my low carb wheat flour, and plan to laminate it. I think it will get that honeycomb!

    1. Hi Debbie, you can find whole egg powder to substitute the egg white and egg yolk powder total weight. If you already have egg white powder, you could try something like heavy cream powder or golden flaxseed meal.

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